Month: March 2018

About what’s important in life – wisdom from a senior

“To survive, to keep on living is the most important thing in this world,” said with low voice Peter, a 71-year-old bushwalker, driving his car to Eureka Camp on a Friday afternoon. Babak and I were going with Peter for the weekend to do a group bush walk at Yarra Junction. We did not have a car, Peter was kind to give us a lift there, where we were meeting the other bushwalkers. After some small chat about where are we originally from, about Uber and its costs, about the high way, cars and fuel, about the enjoyment of work, Peter said he was at a moment in his life when he was taking some time to plan the next 20 years of his life. “I need to focus on what is important at my age”, mentioned Peter. We wanted to hear more. We asked Peter what was it he appreciated in life, looking at it through eyes with more than 70 years of experience in seeing the world. “Health is the most important thing.” …

Cultivating new habits for our wellbeing at work

The one thing you can control is how you treat yourself. And that one thing can change everything. (Leeana Tankersley). Your lower back sinks in pain. Today you may not have the usual head tension (could it be because is Friday!), but you are feeling exhausted. There is no energy left in your body to go out for the evening. You cannot focus much on your friends’ conversation anyway. The plan is to spend your weekend to sleep, forget about tasks, and recover from another stressful week at work. This is not really living, it is dying at work. We know that. Why do we keep on doing it? There are so many articles out there where you can read about some healthy habits at work: drinking enough water, taking regular breaks, standing up and walking from time to time, going out for your lunch break for a short walk. We read about these habits of better dosing our energy and effort at work. They enter through one ear, go out through the other, leaving …

The learnings of a city dweller into the wilderness

The sun was not up yet and we were already on board, on Nooramunga, a 20-metre twin motorboat, harboured in Port Albert, Victoria. We were all mentally prepared and organised for at least nine-hour boat trip to Deal Island. Seasickness pills were our first breakfast…prayers whispered for them to work. This five-day trip, away from work and from all the skills required to live in the city, was a journey of learning. I guess that’s just what happens when you leave the comfort zone of your home, of your office, and end up in a place when all your tech and professional skills are completely useless. 9 hours on the boat = great opportunity to get out of your head and learn something from others. Wynne, an experienced white beard captain with red cheeks said nobody got seasick on the way back. “It’s all in your mind,” he said. Carol, the first mate of Wynne and an excellent boat operator, taught us the rules of conserving the precious water and toilet usage on the boat …